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Sewing and dressmaking  workshops and one to one tuition with professional designer Sarah Culleton.

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Welcome to my blog

 

Welcome to my little blog. If you love to sew or would love to learn to sew, this is the place to be!

By Sarah Culleton, Mar 22 2018 01:06PM

In a few weeks I’ll be holding my Dirndl skirt workshop at Long Eaton Art Room on Saturday 7th April. It’ll be the first in a series of dressmaking workshops focused on making a vintage capsule wardrobe. I’ve chosen garments that can be made as true vintage pieces or updated for a more modern look, depending on your own personal style. And each project will offer a wide range of useful sewing techniques to help you advance your dressmaking skills.


London Skyline 1950's border print Dirndl skirt.
London Skyline 1950's border print Dirndl skirt.

The Dirndl skirt is simply a full gathered skirt attached to a fitted waistband, it originated in the late 1940’s as women’s clothing became more voluminous, after years of wartime restrictions and rationing.


 Modern Dirndl skirts in polka dot and gingham perfect for summer.
Modern Dirndl skirts in polka dot and gingham perfect for summer.

I love this style of skirt and to someone like me with an absolute passion for textiles and print the Dirndl skirt provides a blank canvas to showcase pretty much any fabric you can think of, which makes it the perfect dressmaking project to reflect your own style and personality.



Original vintage Dirndl dating from the 1950's made from hand painted silk.
Original vintage Dirndl dating from the 1950's made from hand painted silk.

You can go full on vintage with a bold border print, or maybe go for a subtle polka dot for a more understated classic look. Your choice of fabric could create a beautiful every day, floral skirt or something fancier for a night out by using satins or lace. It can be made for any season; to keep you cool in summer and warm in winter. I could go on but I’m sure you get the gist!


Border print vintage Dirndl Skirts from the 1940's and 50's.
Border print vintage Dirndl Skirts from the 1940's and 50's.

Personally I absolutely love the beautiful border print fabrics from the 1950’s, but they’re not easy to come by, so when it came to making my workshop sample skirt I searched high and low for the right fabric and eventually found this wonderful heron print cotton lawn designed by a fabric company right on my doorstep here in Derbyshire.


Lady McCelroy Heron print cotton lawn.
Lady McCelroy Heron print cotton lawn.

Although not technically a border print, the repeat of this pattern was large enough to use once on the whole skirt front and back to create a real 1950’s feel, but in a very subtle way. The print itself is a lovely delicate print which almost looks like a watercolour painting and I’m really happy with the way it’s turned out.

My modern-vintage Dirndl skirt.
My modern-vintage Dirndl skirt.

I’m really looking forward to this workshop and seeing the lovely Dirndl skirts that will be made on the day. If you’d like to join me visit my booking page for more information.


By Sarah Culleton, Feb 11 2018 12:57PM

So here we are my very first blog post! I suppose it makes sense to introduce myself. If you don’t know me I’m Sarah and I’ve been creating and sewing for most of my life, teaching on a one to one basis for 6 years and running and devising group workshops for just over two years.


I’ll elaborate on this in a later post but I went into teaching rather late in my career as a designer maker. Initially it was something I considered doing solely as a means of bringing in a bit of cash here and there. It turns out though, that I actually really love teaching. So much so that it has changed the focus of everything I do as a designer and introduced me to so many wonderful and inspiring people.


It has taken me out of my comfort zone and challenges me at every level and I wish I’d done it years ago. Teaching has become as important to me as the business of creating itself, which is a massive revelation and the reason I’ve created this website and blog. I’d like it to be a place where I can talk more in-depth about my workshops, dressmaking projects, design work and maybe even share the odd tip and tutorial here and there. So if you’ve taken the trouble to read this, thank you ever so much and I do hope you’ll come back.






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